"

Not all women are the owners of a uterus, and not all owners of a uterus are women. A transgender man—that is, a man who was assigned female at birth—may very well have a uterus, may become pregnant, and may very well need the same access to reproductive health options as your average cisgender woman. The same can be said for non-binary individuals who were assigned female at birth. As people who don’t identify as a woman or a man (though they may identify themselves as both, neither, or a combination of the two), some may feel that this language erases their identity or leaves them out. Yes, these people may have a uterus—but it’s not a “lady part.”

While there’s little doubt that women make up the largest segment of uterus-owning individuals, this name further ostracizes oft-overlooked members of society like trans men and non-binary individuals who were assigned female at birth. To exclude them in this, an organization aimed at educating the public on the issue of reproductive health, would seem to negate the organization’s stated goals by erasing identities and perpetuating the already stressful and exclusionary culture these individuals are forced to inhabit.

"

The Trouble With “Lady Parts” | Parker Marie Molloy for Slate (via fuckyeahsexeducation)

(Source: gaywrites, via fuckyeahsexeducation)

dynastylnoire:

hikergirl:

Here is the link to the City Lab article and the link to the actual website, Turn On Detroit’s Water.
h/t to amomenttothink for retweeting this.

boooooooooooooooooost

dynastylnoire:

hikergirl:

Here is the link to the City Lab article and the link to the actual website, Turn On Detroit’s Water.

h/t to amomenttothink for retweeting this.

boooooooooooooooooost

(via wretchedoftheearth)

feministdisney:

for more information on Vodou/why its portrayal in Princess and the Frog is problematic/how it has been stereotyped in society (and why no, it’s not okay in this movie just because Mama Odie was a good person,) go here or even more, here

feministdisney:

for more information on Vodou/why its portrayal in Princess and the Frog is problematic/how it has been stereotyped in society (and why no, it’s not okay in this movie just because Mama Odie was a good person,) go here or even more, here

(via thedappledsky)

futuremrsknow-it-all:

Omarosa Manigault on Bethenny Frankel show.

Reblog, every single time.

(Source: brandiglanville, via ashleighthelion)

bethanycantdraw:

Triple discrimination threat. 

(via gradientlair)

glitterlion:

thebigblackwolfe:

roidyraw:

As soon as I learned Nicki Minaj voiced Sugilite, I had to

I’m not gonna stop reblogging this.

um..

studioafrica:

Photographer Hélène Amouzou was born in 1969 in Togo. She began taking photos in 2004 after enrolling on a course in Brussels, where she lives and works. Her images - in which bodies are ghostly or overlaid with wallpaper or sandwiched in suitcases - suggest transience: places which the human body can only inhabit temporarily, and humans who are constantly on the move.  

Her work is weighted by the depth of her questions about place, being and the baggage that accrues to the black female body, and perhaps allude to the (political and social) invisibility of the migrant body - both to those at home and those in the new host country. Further, Amouzou’s images question certainties of nation, identity and belonging, suggesting in-between spaces and un-belonging as the contemporary reality. in her own words: “"I always have the impression of traveling. I am not Togolese, nor Belgian"

- Derica Shields

(via hoodoo-seed)

2damnfeisty:

Keke Palmer geting emotional in an interview with Raven Symone (x)

This is very important. I’m glad both of them had this moment. Raven has been working and grinding longer than most of us have been able to talk and walk. She deserves all the praises.

(Source: jasonnywithnochance, via bamfwomenofcolor)

dynamicafrica:

Test Shots by Rog Walker.

Test Shots is an ongoing series of portraits taken in the studio with photography couple Rog and Bee Walker. Each photograph, taken mostly of their close friends and fellow creatives, is as striking as it is simple.

Opting for a sombre and dark background, coupled with poised and pensive subjects, Walker’s shots manage to maximize on the simplicity of the traditional portrait style by making use of a medium format camera that provides an image quality which, despite the powerful stillness of each individual, vividly brings the details of each photograph to life. This brings out both a sense of strength and vulnerability in each picture, alluding to the intimate two-way dialog between subject and photographer.

"This is the most organic method of communication I have. Photography is the way I speak…It doesn’t get more personal than another human, and that’s what I’m looking to capture, that connection between humanity." - Rog Walker

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(via ethiopienne)